Yakima Town Hall - Upcoming Speakers

Lara Logan

Lara Logan

September 28, 2016 • 11:00 a.m. Capitol Theatre

Veteran Foreign Affairs Journalist Reporting from War Zones
Correspondent, 60 Minutes

In her current role at 60 Minutes, Logan helps us understand the political and human conflicts around the world, including Syria, Pakistan, Iraq, Afghanistan, Israel, Palestine, and Egypt. Committed to the story, she lived in Iraq for five years at the height of the violence. She was one of the few journalists in Baghdad when the U.S. military entered the city, reporting live in the square as the statue of Sadam fell. Logan has earned almost every journalistic and reporting award; among them are the highly prestigious duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton, the Overseas Press Club, the Emmys and the RTNDA/ Edward R. Murrow Award—to name a few. Her fearless determination to get the story from its vortex, no matter how dangerous, has often put Logan herself in great danger. In Tahrir Square in Egypt, she came close to death when she was sexually assaulted by a mob while reporting for 60 Minutes on the Arab Spring. A journalist who heads straight into hostile places not for spectacle, but for the sake of our understanding the real issues of our time, Logan is an insightful interpreter of international current events and a fearless interviewer asking tough questions of today's most powerful people.

Watch a Video about Lara Logan



Peter Sagal

Peter Sagal

October 26th, 2016 • 11:00 a.m. Capitol Theatre

Host, Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

As the host of National Public Radio’s Wait Wait … Don’t Tell Me!, Peter Sagal has captivated news junkies across the country with its lighthearted approach to current events, and has become the biggest and most beloved weekend radio phenomenon since A Prairie Home Companion.
A native of Berkeley Heights, N.J., Peter Sagal attended Harvard University and has worked as a literary manager for a regional theater, a movie publicist, a stage director, an actor, an extra in a Michael Jackson video, a travel writer, an essayist, a ghost writer for a former adult film impresario and a staff writer for a motorcycle magazine.


In 1997, Peter joined the panel of a new news quiz show on NPR, co-produced by WBEZ-Chicago, that made its debut on-air in January of 1998. In May of that year, he moved to Chicago to become the host of the show. Since then, Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me! has become one of the most popular shows on public radio, heard by nearly three million listeners on 520 public radio stations nationwide, and heard by a million people every month via podcast.


The show made history in 2007 when, in May, Stephen Breyer became the first sitting Supreme Court Justice to appear on a quiz show, and then, in July, in front of ten thousand fans at Chicago's Millennium Park, Peter conducted the first (and so far, only) personal interview with United States Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald since his conviction of White House Aide Scooter Libby. In 2008, Wait Wait celebrated its 10th anniversary on the air, and was the recipient of a Peabody Award for excellence in broadcasting.


In October 2007, Harper Collins published Peter's first book, The Book of Vice: Naughty Things and How to Do Them, a series of essays about bad behavior, which was released in paperback in 2008. He is also a regular columnist for Runner's World, and has completed the Chicago, New York and Boston Marathons.

Watch a Video about Peter Sagal



Lisa Genova

Lisa Genova

March 22, 2017 • 11:00 a.m. Capitol Theatre

Bestselling Author and Neuroscientist

“Genova is the master of getting into the heads of her
characters, relating from the inside out...brilliantly. A well-told
tale from a keen medical mind.”
—USA Today

Lisa Genova graduated valedictorian, summa cum laude from Bates College with a degree in biopsychology and has a Ph.D. in neuroscience from Harvard University. She is the author of the New York Times bestselling novels Still Alice, Left Neglected, Love Anthony, and Inside the O’Briens. In her own words, Genova says: “The novels I write are about people living with neurological diseases and conditions that are feared, ignored, or misunderstood, portrayed within a story that is accessible to the general public. When we simply learn the science and statistics—every 68 seconds someone in the US is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s; 1 in 88 children in the US have autism—it’s staggering, but the information tends to stay intellectual, in our heads. Novels reveal the humanity behind these numbers. Stories are a way into people’s hearts, and when this happens, we have more than knowledge. We have real understanding, empathy, sensitivity, the ability to be better caregivers, and maybe the motivation to get involved.”

Speaking about the neurological diseases and disorders she writes about, Lisa has appeared on The Today Show, Dr. Oz, The Diane Rehm Show, CNN, Chronicle, Fox News, and Canada AM and was featured in the Emmy award-winning documentary film, To Not Fade Away. The National Alzheimer’s Association awarded her with the Sargent and Eunice Shriver Profiles in Dignity Award in March 2015. She was awarded the 2015 Pell Center Prize in recognition of “a contemporary storyteller whose work has had a significant impact on the public dialogue.”

Watch a Video about Lisa Genova



David Epstein

David Epstein

April 19, 2017 • 11:00 a.m. Capitol Theatre

Best-Selling Author of “The Sports Gene”

Are stars like Usain Bolt, Michael Phelps, and Serena Williams genetic freaks put on Earth to dominate their respective sports? Or are they simply normal people who overcame their biological limits through sheer force of will and obsessive training? In the decade since the sequencing of the human genome, researchers have slowly begun to uncover how the relationship between biological endowments and a competitor’s training environment affects athleticism. Based on his bestselling book The Sports Gene: Inside the Science of Extraordinary Athletic Performance, David Epstein tackles the great nature vs. nurture debate and traces how far science has come in solving this timeless riddle.

In this controversial and engaging exploration of athletic success, Epstein investigates the so-called 10,000-hour rule, made famous by Malcolm Gladwell, to uncover whether rigorous and consistent practice from a young age is the only route to athletic excellence. Along the way, Epstein dispels many of our perceptions about why top athletes excel. He shows why some skills that we assume are innate, like the bullet-fast reactions of a baseball or cricket batter, are not, and why other characteristics that we assume are entirely voluntary, like an athlete’s will to train, in fact have important genetic components. Some amazing facts from Epstein’s work include: Redheads have a higher tolerance for pain than other hair’d people; nearly all professional baseball players have better than 20/20 vision; only a specific tribe within Kenya is actually good at distance running; and 17% of seven-foot-tall American men between the ages of 20 and 40 play in the NBA.

As the former Senior Writer for Sports Illustrated (SI), Epstein has become one of the top sports science and medicine investigative journalist today. His work has appeared in TIME Magazine, Discover, Scientific American, The Washington Post, Slate, National Geographic, British GQ, The Guardian, Inside Higher Ed and The New York Times, among other publications

Watch a Video about David Epstein



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"Tonight I'm thinking with affection of my sojourn to your town. I remember with undiminished appreciation your fine group and the enchanting Capitol Theatre." - Olivia de Havilland, Actress

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